Extra step to activate Java on Chrome.

Oracle link to both of the following.

Oracle says the following about Java not working with Chrome:

The Java plug-in for web browsers relies on the cross platform plugin architecture NPAPI, which has long been, and currently is, supported by all major web browsers. Google announced in September 2013 plans to remove NPAPI support from Chrome by “the end of 2014″, thus effectively dropping support for Silverlight, Java, Facebook Video and other similar NPAPI based plugins. Recently, Google has revised their plans and now state that they plan to completely remove NPAPI by late 2015. As it is unclear if these dates will be further extended or not, we strongly recommend Java users consider alternatives to Chrome as soon as possible. Instead, we recommend Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari as longer-term options. As of April 2015, starting with Chrome Version 42, Google has added an additional step to configuring NPAPI based plugins like Java to run

Got news for ya Oracle. I’m MORE likely to drop Java than Chrome. Just sayin’.

If you want to get Java to work with Chrome after version 42 do the following:

As of Chrome Version 42, an additional configuration step is required to continue using NPAPI plugins.

  1. In your URL bar, enter:
    chrome://flags/#enable-npapi
  2. Click the Enable link for the Enable NPAPI configuration option.
  3. Click the Relaunch button that now appears at the bottom of the configuration page.

 

 

 

 

Troubling

By now everyone and their pet parrot have an opinion on the Indiana RFRA law. I don’t intend to discuss whether that law is good or bad but something more meta about it. Specifically, what’s bothering me is the fact that PEOPLE’S opinions don’t seem to be having much affect on the law makers. No, the only voices that seem to be bothering THEM is from corporations. THAT BOTHERS ME. I don’t think this is supposed to be “government for the corporations by their paid sub-contractors”. The ENORMOUS pressure being brought to bear that everyone is talking about is CORPORATE POWER.

We should ALL be bothered by that. Maybe THIS time the majority of powerful corporations are backing your position but what about NEXT time? Corporations need to have LESS ability to affect our laws and lawmakers and the CITIZENS, the actual PEOPLE, of our country need to have MORE.

I’ll just leave this here for Comcast customers that want to downgrade their service

Here is the Official Comcast Customer Support answer for downgrading your service:

Change or Upgrade Your Service

To upgrade your services, please log into My Account and shop for upgrades. Or if you’d prefer, please call us at the number below and we can help.

If you’d like to downgrade or change your package, we are not able to do that online yet. However, our customer service agents are happy to assist you.

Please call us at 1-800-XFINITY (1-800-934-6489).

 

So there you have it. A Billion dollar cable and ISP company is INCAPABLE of providing downgrade information or availability ONLINE but UPGRADING IS AVAILABLE! I’m sure it’s just too technically taxing for them and has NOTHING to do with making their customers frustrated with monopolistic BAD SERVICE.

How often do YOU comment on things of which you have no clue?

Sometimes when I read Ars Technica, or other blogs both general and subject specific, which have a large commentator population, I get the impression that  a significant proportion of the commenters have no clue about what they write. In this article about the Police not liking Waze ‘tracking’ them you can tell that a LARGE part of the problem with some of the comments is that the people making those comments have never used Waze.

The Internet is a silly/horrible/awesome/frighting place.

Guilty ‘Pleasure’? Definitely NOT the right word. The econ blogs I read more than is good for my happiness.

Calculated Risk. This one can be a bit dry and focused on things I don’t particulary care about.

Economist’s View. This one I check often. It tends to be links to other noteworthy posts on economics and/or policy effects of econ.

House of Debt. Gets deeper than I can understand pretty often. Only check it rarely.

Naked Capitalism. This is one of my favourites and check it more often than any of the rest. The comments on contentious subjects can be even better than the posts. Plus Bill Black often gets quoted here and I really like his take on things.

Mainly Macro. Simon Wren-Lewis’ blog. He often gets quoted on Economist’s View so I like to check out what’s on his mind.